Project Amazonas

A non-political, non-sectarian NGO working since 1994 to serve the people of the Amazon and conserve the rainforest.

During the rainy season the Amazon River overflows its banks and can extend into the forest for a width of 25 miles in some places. Where it empties into the Atlantic Ocean, the Amazon is over 200 miles wide!

Every day, an area of rainforest equivalent to 86,400 football fields is chopped down worldwide. The Peruvian rainforest has largely escaped this wide-scale destruction. Help us to keep it that way!

Although rainforests cover less than 2% of the Earth's surface area, they are home to 50% of the Earth's plant and animal species.

A typical four square mile patch of rainforest may contain as many as 1,500 flowering plant species, 750 species of trees, 400 species of birds and 150 species of butterflies.

More than 2,000 tropical forest plants have been identified as having anti-cancer properties. Most of these have yet to be clinically tested, however.

The Amazon covers 2.5 million miles, about the size of the USA west of the Mississippi.

Rainforests act as a planetary thermostat by regulating and moderating temperatures and weather patterns. By absorbing carbon and sequestering CO2, rainforest help slow global climate change.

One in five of all bird species in the world can be found in the Amazon Basin. At our four field stations in the Peruvian Amazon, over 550 species of birds have been recorded!

Although about 25% of all drugs are derived from rainforest ingredients, scientists have only examined the medicinal properties of around 1% of tropical plants. A large number of plant species in the Peruvian Amazon have been utilized by indigenous and other inhabitants of the region for medicinal purposes. The large medicinal plant and traditional remedies section of the Belen Market in Iquitos is a "must-visit" for anyone traveling to Iquitos.

Over one fifth of the world's fresh water is contained in the Amazon basin's rivers, streams, and tributaries.

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Recent News

Yagua Artifacts exhibited at the Frost Museum in Miami, Florida

The Frost Museum on the campus of Florida International University, Miami, Florida, recently hosted an exhibit of artifacts of daily use from the Yagua tribe of the western Amazon (Peruvian Amazon region). We are very pleased to have had this opportunity to showcase the Yagua, and thankful for the assistance of the Frost, The Honors College at FIU, and Professor Jim Riach and student center gallery manager Christopher Rodriguez in putting together this exhibit. Follow the link for a "video-walkthrough" of the exhibit!  We hope you enjoy it!  Click here:  http://vimeo.com/29394967

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Student Video features Madre Selva Biological Station

A March 2011 course from Lawrenceville School, has resulted in a student video featuring the field station and the activities of the students during the course. To view the 8-minute video, follow the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nuw6cjIpiwI&feature=email  Many thanks to the students and staff of Lawrenceville School!

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